Victoria NeuroNotes

Is It Heavy Metal or the Bible?

100 Comments

Take the quiz.

Can you tell them apart? I scored 13 out of 16.

If you’re at work, you might want to use your earbuds.

START

 

Clearly the two genres have a lot in common.

 

Blood!

Pain!

Apocalyptic violence!

 

I find it quite ironic when preachers tell Christians that Heavy Metal is the work of the devil. Satan’s music.

 

If you haven’t read “Drunk With Blood“, by Steve Wells, I recommend it.

drunk with blood

Steve Pinker, a cognitive scientist, psychologist, and linguist at Harvard University, writes:

“An eye-opening look at the rapes, genocides, and murders that are recounted with relish and approval in the so-called Good Book, and a nice reminder of how modern secular morality, based on human rights and human flourishing, is so much father advanced than the traditional morality of religion.”

 

 

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Author: NeuroNotes

Victoria predominately blogs about religion, and the brain's role in religious type experiences.

100 thoughts on “Is It Heavy Metal or the Bible?

  1. 15 of 16

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I scored the same as you Victoria!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m going to do this tomorrow while husband is at work lol… I’m excited to see how I do.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Can’t wait to try it. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I got 14 so I’m happy with that. Remember folks, the narrative is that the Bible is all about teaching us how to be moral and to love others (the greatest commandment… something even Yahweh can’t do, but… hey… that’s child’s play next to being born broken and commanded to be whole ). Yup, nothing dysfunctional about Christianity.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I got 13 out of 16. My sister took it (she’s still quite religious), and she got 9 out of 16. The Psalm about dashing kids against rocks really disturbed her.

    Since this quiz greatly amused me, I hereby present this quiz to tell the difference between lines from 50 Shades of Grey and Contemporary Christian Music. It’s not a cool flash animation, but I thought it was hilarious about how I couldn’t tell the difference.

    Hope you enjoy!

    Liked by 4 people

  7. I got them all right. Wow, that was disturbing.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. 15/16. 😀

    I didn’t recognize many of the metal lyrics, but they seem more poetic, and sometimes less clear, than the bible verses.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I’m worried – I got 15/16. . perhaps because I hear some of my students’ music (which I don’t like, by the way, but I don’t tell them 🙂 ) As much as I don’t like it, one has to admit it IS poetry and it certainly does ‘speak’ to teenagers (and Victoria, you know that they are my favourite people).

    Had time to kill (used that word on purpose, heh, heh) as the floor has just been scrubbed.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. The metal ones frequently have a tempo and rhyme that gives them away. I suspect this is much harder for Christians that gloss over the nasty sections of their book while simultaneously thinking metal-heads are devil worshipers that dream of eating babies.

    “There she lusted after her lovers, whose genitals were like those of donkeys and whose emission was like that of horses.” – So metal

    14/16

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I got 11/16.
    It does seem to me there is little difference between metal and bible

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Good grief no Victoria! I just started listening and my ears started aching. I don’t like heavy metal at all.
    You made a great point here. 😀 ♥

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Hahahaha, great idea, and I too scored 13 out of 16. I suspect the metal heads generally make more sense out of the two, but they could easily be from the same book. Thanks for the morning smile.

    – s.u.t.Cloud

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Pinker confuses me a little. In his assessment of whether we’re becoming less violent over time he uses as a measure the killings in the OT.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Interesting. I have seen a few of his lectures on the subject, and I was under the impression that he was referring to the violence of biblical times, such as the Bronze, Iron and early Middle Ages when barbarianism reigned.

      Like

      • I could be wrong, but as far as I remember he cites the genocides listed in the OT as real events, real numbers.

        Like

        • Well, that’s interesting. I didn’t read his book “The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined”, so it’s possible he mentioned numbers. I just re-watched his lecture “The Surprising Decline in Violence” and he quotes out of Numbers 31, but I got the impression that he was using that as an example of the mentality and practice of tribalism during the Bronze and Iron Ages. It’s just after the 4 minute marker. He never mentions the number of deaths with regard to the Bible.

          Pinker is an atheist, and I doubt he would consider the Bible a source for actual empirical evidence, but I can see how mentioning the Bible could lead to confusion.

          Liked by 1 person

  15. 14 of 16. That was funny. Have a great day!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. 13 out of 16! Too funny how similar they were

    Like

  17. Do I need to do the 50 shades quiz? I read the first book lol

    Liked by 1 person

  18. 14 of 16, I guess that would be a B+?

    I love that tabbed bible, that is hilarious!

    “Behold, I come quickly. Rev. 22:12” Sounds like someone thinks that is something to brag about.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. 10/16. Obviously I need to listen to more metal, as reading more Bible is just out of the question.

    And only 5/10 on the 50SoG vs Christian Rock quiz, but I see no desirable way to improve my score on that one.

    These are by far the most useful online quizzes I’ve seen in years.

    Liked by 1 person

    • “Obviously I need to listen to more metal, as reading more Bible is just out of the question.”

      I hear ya.

      “And only 5/10 on the 50SoG vs Christian Rock quiz, but I see no desirable way to improve my score on that one.”

      LOL — I’m right there with you. Thanks for taking the time to do the quiz and sharing the result with us.

      Like

  20. 15/16, missed the Job reference. Must have missed a Sunday night bible drill once. But bible knowledge can be annoyingly handy when it comes to refuting arguments and ridiculing movies. My husband rented a movie earlier this week. When I asked what it was he said, “Nothing you want to see. ‘Exodus: God and Kings'” I said he could watch it in the bedroom, wouldn’t bother my reading a bit. I was able to ignore it mostly until it went totally off track and I started pulling a Mystery Science Theater 3000 on fact check. I stopped before I got too annoying and promptly fell asleep. He said the ending was as disappointing as the rest of the movie. When I was a believer, it drove me nuts when Hollywood decided to change the “facts”. Now that I’m not, it STILL annoys me – the original myths are about as outlandish as you can get, so why reinvent the wheel?!?

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I think the best thing that any heavy metal group could do, would be to make a song using actual verses from the bible and then when the conservative religioso’s get their panties all up in a bunch about it (because they probably wouldn’t recognize where the lyrics came from), we could listen to them rant and rave for a while and then point out the source of the lyrics and watch as they have a mental breakdown and/or poop their pants.
    I’d actually pay money to see that.
    Can we band together and find a way to make that happen?

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Lol that loud music scared the shit out of me. Ummmm- I scored 8 out of 16- figures 50-50 lol. I know the Bible very little and metal- so pretty damn good considering 😆😂

    Liked by 1 person

  23. 14 out of 16 and I knew one was a Bible verse but pressed it anyway just to see it say Wrong!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. OK. So, I can’t get the quiz. I even downloaded Bzz thing for iPad. I mean not that I would have scored remotely highly. I swear you devise you blog posts for the neuronotically challenged. On the plus side I did find one about how old are you by the words you use. I was 61. So were a load of twenty-year-olds. It wasn’t a totally fruitless effort 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  25. 14. I just guessed by which sounded lyrical. Such a peace oriented book, no?
    *sigh*
    I love that they used quotes from throughout the Bible. Revelations is one of those books people like to pretend isn’t there.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. I got 13. A bit disappointed, I must admit. Though I have read the Bible, I must admit, that I had better luck in recognizing the Slayer lyrics, as they have made a slightly more influential impression on me in a voulnerable age, than the “good book”. Then again there are these new gargling metal bands I have not even heard of in the list too that I got wrong.

    There are actually Christian heavy rock bands out there. Mostly their music is terrible crap, even though they could use the immense lyrical heritage from the Bible. It seems to me, they are very unimaginative about the subject. Maybe it is a bit too “close”, or perhaps they shy away from the Old Testament stuff, that does not fit in with their modern view on Christian values, that are often from the liberal end of the spectrum, or their type of music would not be tolerated in their social cickles at all, or something.

    However, music is the main form of art in the equasion of heavy metal. To a certain degree I do not care wether the lyrics are terrible, as long as the music is good. I do not think I have to appriciate the political innuendo or racial ideals of Richard Wagner to appriciate his music, any more than I have to appriciate the religious fervour of Johan Sebastian Bach, Glen Danzig, or Venom for that matter to like their music. But the artistic experience is naturally more full when I feel a connection to the lyrics and message. For example as often is in my case with Motörhead or with Dimitry Shostakowitz. 😉 Yet, one of my favourite songs of all times is the Palestinalied by Walther von der Vogelweide who lived in the turn of the 12th and 13th century, that tells the story of the Crusader from his view.

    Liked by 1 person

    • “To a certain degree I do not care wether the lyrics are terrible, as long as the music is good. I do not think I have to appriciate the political innuendo or racial ideals of Richard Wagner to appriciate his music, any more than I have to appriciate the religious fervour of Johan Sebastian Bach, Glen Danzig, or Venom for that matter to like their music. But the artistic experience is naturally more full when I feel a connection to the lyrics and message.”

      Same here. I grew up listening to instrumental music because that was my dad’s favorite music. My mom played the piano so I heard a lot of non-lyrical piano music, too. I learned to appreciate music without lyrics. I could actually memorize lyrics to a song I heard on the radio and sing along and not even pay attention to the meaning of the lyrics. But as I grew into adulthood I gained a greater appreciation for music when I paid attention to the lyrics, the message. Like you noted, the artistic experiences is naturally more full when I feel a connection to the lyrics and message.

      Thanks for stopping by Rautakyy. It’s been a while. Hope you’re doing well. 🙂

      Like

  27. I got 15 out of the 16. Missed one. And I don’t listen to metal and have not read a bible in 30 years. I guess early training stays with us. Hugs

    Liked by 1 person

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