Victoria NeuroNotes

Into the Gray

When You’re So Full Of Yourself, You Tell Tornadoes Where To Go

133 Comments

At the crack of dawn, while in REM sleep, I thought I was dreaming when I heard 3 intensely loud alarm sounds. Upon awakening, I thought “was that a dream?” Then—there was a knock at my door, followed by a calm, yet concerned voice:

“We’re under a tornado warning.”

I currently live right on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, just a few blocks from the beach. While we do get an occasional water spout, rarely coming ashore, we generally don’t get the threat of tornadoes on the immediate coast.

This morning was an exception.

Fourteen people have been killed this past week in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas. At least 40 people across six Mississippi counties were injured in the unseasonal storm.

 

When the media interviewed some of the residence, I kept hearing people say:

“Thank you Jesus, praise the lord. God protected us from the storm.”

 

As you probably already know, Texas was also hit hard.

 

So, I was stunned when I heard this on NPR (National Public Radio):

Listen at around the 1:30 minute marker.

Quoting from a Texas Christian claiming to have diverted the powerful tornado to another neighborhood:

“We actually went outside and started commanding the winds, because God had given us authority over the winds, the airways. And we just began to command this storm not to hit our area. We spoke to the storm and said, ‘Go to unpopulated places.’ It did exactly what we said to do, because God gave us the authority to do that.”

No, it didn’t go to unpopulated places. It rampaged through a Dallas area community, killing 11 people and destroying more than 1,000 homes and businesses. With wind speeds up to 180 mph, the tornado swept through another nearby community killing 8 more people while destroying another 600 homes and businesses.

Betty Bower 2

Exactly.


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Author: NeuroNotes

Victoria predominately blogs about religion, and the brain's role in religious type experiences.

133 thoughts on “When You’re So Full Of Yourself, You Tell Tornadoes Where To Go

  1. Well said. I find the “God spared us, so praise him” comments to be as offensive as they are ignorant of reality. God spares you from a tornado but kills untold amounts of others with it. Yeah. What a fantastic fella, eh?

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Oh, dear. I wonder what the reaction would be if I said (on live radio) – “My imaginary unicorn protected me and my things- I summoned her and she just turned that howling wind in the opposite direction and our flag pole was spared” . . .

    Just. Frickin’. Amazing. Hubris

    Problem is, in the right crowd, my smirking headshake would be met with other ‘Amen!’s

    Liked by 2 people

  3. First off, as a Christian, God doesn’t command anyone to do a dang thing, and if they actually picked up their bible and read it, they would know God doesn’t have conversations or tell anyone anything. Period. That’s the voice inside your head telling you what you want to hear.

    Second off, I can understand where you’re coming from, and where they are coming from, but God didn’t kill anybody. If they read their bible, they’d know that too. God gave free will to human beings, and gave the Devil the reigns. He controls this world. God is biding his time until the rapture.

    This is a sad situation, and everyone should be allowed to grieve how they wish, or say thanks for being spared how they wish. They are also entitled to feel how they want to, without being made fun of, or scorned, as are you all. Some of it, hey, it makes sense, and they deserve it. Some of it is undeserving.

    I hope you all have a good day. 🙂

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    • That started off pretty good there, right up to the free will and giving the devil the reins thing, which is where it screeched off the road and into the ditch.

      You had me with you for a minute there. I’m glad I had my atheist seatbelt on.

      Liked by 8 people

      • Thank you for responding. I’m glad you had it on too, for ditches can be painful.

        You are entitled to your beliefs, and I am entitled to mine. We can agree to disagree and move forward I hope. I just think people should be entitled to believe how they wish, with no lash back or ugly comments.

        That can be said for Christians too, not just atheists. I’m a veteran, I fought so everyone could have their opinion without hate or criticism from the government. It’s engrained in my head to defend that right.

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    • Thanks for commenting, SCS It’s common rhetoric for Christians to tell other Christians, people of other faiths, and non-believers, that their cultural god or holy book said or didn’t say such and such, as though they are “the” expert — the “True Christian™”. Whether believers are conscious of it or not, claiming, and thanking out loud around others who have suffered much loss, comes across as insensitive, even arrogant.

      Liked by 4 people

      • I’m not telling someone they don’t know anything. I actually defended you the entire time, or that was my intention. My only thing I wanted to get across that was once again, the way I wanted to come off, was that people here said some insensitive things about Christians. But that was my opinion, if that was not the way it was meant to come across I apologize.

        It’s not common rhetoric for me, and by no means am I a true Christian. I’m just one who is trying to do the best she can until she learns how to do so better. I don’t believe personally there is a true Christian, but I bet there’s a ton of people out there who’d love to prove me wrong.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Just so you know how you come across to others here, you made claims as though you were an expert on what your cultural god does and doesn’t do. Then you started on about your cultural devil and his powers, as though you are claiming that an evil entity caused the tornadoes. I’m not sure where the free will comes into play here when so many people have been devastated by these storms.

          Liked by 4 people

          • I wasn’t speaking about the devil causing anything in relation to these storms, I was speaking into the relation of people being killed in general. Storms are a natural occurrence of the atmosphere, and I don’t any being controls the weather.

            I was speaking on the reference of human killings. Human beings weren’t meant to kill each other. Period. That I know for fact. That I am an expert on. Don’t ask how, you’ll get an ugly answer.

            I just claimed what I know. This is also what I know. Many Christians are hypocritical, and judgmental. I try not to be. Once again, I apologize if I offended or hurt anybody, that wasn’t my intention.

            Liked by 1 person

            • I suspect you might feel you have waded into a bit of a storm here on this site.

              I have not come across you on Victoria’s site previously so I will say welcome.

              Given this site tends to spend a fair bit of time focussing on the psychological damage that results from following Christianity, you might find that the overall tone of discussion is not especially sympathetic to the Christian worldview.

              Liked by 4 people

    • “First off, as a Christian, God doesn’t command anyone to do a dang thing, and if they actually picked up their bible and read it, they would know God doesn’t have conversations or tell anyone anything.”
      I beg to differ. God very clearly tells Abraham to murder his son, to prove his devotion to him. God tells him to spare his son at the last minute. God talked to Abraham several times throughout the first 5 books of the OT.
      Secondly, you cannot “give” freewill to someone. That negates the very concept of free will on its face. In addition to that, if the Devil controls the world, the concept of free will is again negated. You cannot have free will AND have the Devil in control of everything that happens. It’s one or the other. All you can have is the illusion of free will. Which, co-incidentally what I believe – that free will is at least partly an illusion – but not for the reasons that you ascribe to it.
      “They are also entitled to feel how they want to, without being made fun of, or scorned”. Yes, people most certainly are entitled to feel how they want to about anything. The minute they stand up and proclaim their feelings (God spared me!) then they are rightly subjected to ridicule and scorn. If they didn’t want their feelings hurt, they can keep their nonsense to themselves.

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  4. My first thought was what kind of freaking moron believes that God gave them wind diversion powers? Then I realized this was in Texas… That pretty much means 90% of the residents there. So pretty much on par.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Keep safe, Victoria. Those historical quotes are amazing. There are few more exasperating things in life than religious fervor during times of crisis; and, I fear more is coming. I’ve been monitoring the climate situation very closely and there seems little doubt now that the frequency, extent, and severity of extreme weather events will continue to get worse going forward.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Thought the same thing as I heard the report this am too. Certain sections of the pentacostal churches believe they can speak to things and create reality. It’s not really biblical but they pull verses to support it. Basically christian witchcraft. But I also wonder about the homes and families and lives affected in the areas these crazy christians ‘send’ the storms where they might not have gone without the command to go…
    “Save my home by wrecking the one down the street.. they’re evil anyways”
    Utter nonsense and bull s**t.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. You’re right. “Pray to the mountain, be thou removed!!” Doesn’t work. Nothing fails like prayer

    Liked by 1 person

  8. That is utter nonsense and bullshit. I’m sorry you even had to hear that.

    No one should send something like this anywhere, and God, or any other being doesn’t control the weather anyway, so that’s fucking stupid. Sorry for my language, but that’s absolutely ridiculous.

    I’ve seen people, come home from overseas never the same, and people wish for people to die or even be hurt? Boils my blood.

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    • Why do you say nobody has control of the weather but most believers in God say he does have control of everything because he is omnipotent?

      People dying and disasters around the world are explained by Christian author and apologist Lee Strobel to be “Because we live in a sin scarred cosmos”, “a sin-corrupted world,”

      Another web site by Ken Giese says: “Clearly suffering was brought into the world as a result of sin. This does not mean that people who are suffering are always the cause of their own suffering; often people suffer because of the sins of others. And though suffering is painful and we should do whatever we can to avoid causing it, God can even use suffering to produce good. As we read in the book of Hebrews, suffering helped Jesus Christ achieve something of value:”

      This same web site also continues with a Mother Teresa type of attitude: “Suffering can have the same impact upon us that it had upon Jesus Christ—it can aid us in becoming more Christlike in our character and in our lives.”

      This rubbish is rammed down the throats of thousands of people every day even after they lose their homes and loved family members. And what is even more amazing is they continue to swallow these lies time after time.

      Great post Victoria and my condolences to anybody who has lost loved ones during these disasters.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Not all Christians believe the same, and I for one believe none of that. I believe we are sinners, we sin everyday, but I don’t believe God does those types of things.

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        • If YHWH exists, do you think he would communicate clearly enough to be understood by his followers? When by not doing so, many develop harmful and antisocial attitudes?

          Liked by 2 people

          • No, I don’t. I don’t think he communicates with people, as people can’t understand him. I believe we read the bible, say prayer and have a personal relationship with him. He works in our lives, he has no need to speak to us.

            Look, I can’t speak for all Christians, and I’m not gonna try. Some of them do nasty horrible things, and I’m sorry for that. I just try my best to live my life the best way I know how, until I learn to do so better.

            Liked by 1 person

            • “No, I don’t.”

              Interesting and surprising. You don’t think your god wants to be understood by the people with whom he is supposed to be communicating?

              Suppose I sent you and your friends and family important messages, the meaning of which is shrouded in mystery. You all come up with different and contradictory interpretations of its meaning, some of which lead to harmful and antisocial attitudes (at least). Then when you ask me to clarify, I refuse to respond. Have I behaved morally in this scenario?

              Liked by 1 person

              • First off, my God is everyones God in my opinion, whether you choose to believe that or not is on you, and I’m not gonna ram it down your throat by any means. Secondly, no, I don’t think any important messages are sent. You see, here’s my interpretation of the bible. It’s a big guide book. God gives you all the information you need, to live by his standards there. Why communicate, when you have everything you need in one central memo already?

                Thirdly, as long as you believe the Gospel, which is that Jesus Died for you, was raised from the dead and went to heaven to be with his father, and you live as Christ like as you can, you are saved.

                Are the actions of these people who pray for tornadoes and say God gave them the power to make it go away, or control wind Christ like? Absolutely not. God has the power to control anything and everything, but he doesn’t. I don’t believe so anyway. He made it so he didn’t have to. It works itself just fine. Natural disasters occur everywhere, and they did even during biblical times.

                I just live my life, the best way I know how. I do the best I can, and I guess when the time comes, I’ll find out it was good enough. I’d rather live a lifetime believing in something and be wrong, than live a lifetime not being wrong, and spend an eternity regretting it.

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                • I appreciate your civil engagement. It’s more than a lot of Christians would do.

                  I’m unsure of the optimal approach to take here. So I chose: I will continue testing your extrapolation of your Christian conception of the YHWH god hypothesis. If your claims are true, I think they ought to withstand scrutiny.

                  First off, my God is everyones God in my opinion, whether you choose to believe that or not is on you, and I’m not gonna ram it down your throat by any means.

                  I didn’t choose not to believe; I came to a conclusion based on my research finding the (lack of) evidence for the alleged resurrection of Jesus, among other things.

                  So your claim that your god is everyone’s god remains to be demonstrated. Why should I believe your claim?

                  I appreciate the lack of throat ramming.

                  Secondly, no, I don’t think any important messages are sent. You see, here’s my interpretation of the bible. It’s a big guide book. God gives you all the information you need, to live by his standards there…

                  Thirdly, as long as you believe the Gospel, which is that Jesus Died for you, was raised from the dead and went to heaven to be with his father, and you live as Christ like as you can, you are saved.

                  So the bible is a collection of unimportant messages, a big guide book with unclear standards that believers can’t agree on? Unimportant, though it also tells you how to be saved from eternal damnation (or annihilation) by its author? And many Christians of various denominations – let alone Jews – will disagree with your interpretation of what it takes to be saved. But no need to clarify, because it’s not important? Is chancing the alleged eternal fates of people’s souls is a game to this god?

                  Why communicate, when you have everything you need in one central memo already?

                  Re “Why communicate…?”:

                  1. Keep in mind that written communication (books, letters, email, blog posts, etc.) still qualifies as communication.

                  2. Why? Because the (alleged) original messages are unclear enough to cause division and harm, as I explained earlier.

                  Also, which collection of books comprises the central memo? The Protestant bible? The Catholic bible? Orthodox?

                  Are the actions of these people who pray for tornadoes and say God gave them the power to make it go away, or control wind Christ like? Absolutely not.

                  I don’t know – seems to line up with Matthew 21:21. If you disagree with the Christians claiming it, you’re demonstrating the lack of clarity in the message I’ve been describing.

                  God has the power to control anything and everything, but he doesn’t. I don’t believe so anyway. He made it so he didn’t have to. It works itself just fine. Natural disasters occur everywhere, and they did even during biblical times.

                  “Just fine” you say? Does the world existing with these natural disasters which indescriminately kill and injure millions, along with disease, plagues, starvation, etc., really qualify as “just fine”?

                  If you had the ability to stop this tornado (and every tornado) from killing people and damaging property and livelihoods, without so much as lifting a finger, but you refused, should I think that you’ve acted morally? If not, why should I think any differently of any god who could allegedly do so? And lacking evidence of the particular alleged moral god who apparently acts immorally, why should I even think he exists?

                  I just live my life, the best way I know how. I do the best I can, and I guess when the time comes, I’ll find out it was good enough. I’d rather live a lifetime believing in something and be wrong, than live a lifetime not being wrong, and spend an eternity regretting it.

                  Was “not being wrong” toward the end of the sentence supposed to be “being wrong”? If not, then I don’t quite follow.

                  I’d rather know what’s true than take a guess. When I can’t know, I’ll withold judgement. When I can be reasonably certain, I’ll draw a conclusion. If new evidence arises, I’ll adjust my beliefs. Do you think this approach is more or less honest than faith or guessing?

                  If your god exists and he punishes me simply for not believing that he exists without evidence, is he really just? Or loving?

                  …BTW, in my previous analogy, imagine too that the message sender is your father who loves you, but won’t speak to you or write to you personally, let alone visit – and he refuses to explain why. Mightn’t it be more likely then that the message sender doesn’t really love you, or doesn’t exist?

                  Liked by 3 people

                  • First of all, let me say I appreciate you being civil as well. It’s very nice, and with the night I’ve had, I appreciate it sincerely.

                    I will also tell you, to be perfectly honest, I cannot answer these questions honestly, and no I don’t know the answers. I can however, relate to what your saying. It does make sense coming from your point of view.

                    However, I have experiences that make me believe, as I’ve stated before. So while I still don’t have the answers, I’m a believer. I have my faith, and it’s saved my life a time or two, and that’s being literal.

                    Liked by 2 people

                    • First of all, let me say I appreciate you being civil as well. It’s very nice, and with the night I’ve had, I appreciate it sincerely.

                      I was concerned that you might not see it as civil, in light of how many believers take such things personally. So this is a relief. I’d give you a hug for that. 🙂

                      I will also tell you, to be perfectly honest, I cannot answer these questions honestly, and no I don’t know the answers. I can however, relate to what your saying. It does make sense coming from your point of view.

                      Thanks.

                      However, I have experiences that make me believe, as I’ve stated before. So while I still don’t have the answers, I’m a believer. I have my faith, and it’s saved my life a time or two, and that’s being literal.

                      I’m not inclined to go much further, then.

                      But should you ever waver or become dissuaded of your faith, please don’t lose hope, too. We nonbelievers do find joy and ways of coping with hardship. We find meaning in life, and things to live for. And many of us on blogs like these understand the challenges of wrestling with such deep questions, and potentially changing your mind about them.

                      Liked by 4 people

                    • Thank you! No need to be worried, I can handle more than what most can. I understand everyone has an opinion, and I respect them! I only lash out when I feel disrespected. You didn’t do that at all, so we’re okay! 🙂

                      Liked by 3 people

              • Gah, forgot about blockquotes not working here..

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            • If God doesn’t communicate with people, how is it that the Bible is supposed to be the word of God, if it was written by man? What I have always been told is that God spoke to those who wrote the Bible and this is why the Bible is God’s word. However if people can’t understand God and God doesn’t communicate with people, how can we be sure any of the Bible is representative of what God actually wants?

              Liked by 2 people

              • We don’t. That’s why it’s called Faith. You have to have faith. We all have faith in something, and some of us choose to have faith in God. Others in Science. I respect all opinions. I may not agree but I respect them. 🙂

                Liked by 1 person

                • But having faith in God and believing in the literal truth of a book that by what your saying were written by imperfect beings who could not have communicated with God seems like a dicey way to live your life. I can understand people having faith in a higher power much more than I can understand believing in the literal truth of the doctrine written by a particular group of people at a particular time in history in a particular geographic region. This is far different than science which at least allows you to continually test and adjust your knowledge based on whether testing supports or falsifies a hypothesis. And if a method comes along which shows us a better way of understanding how the universe works than the scientific method than this too would be replaced. It seems to me that science needs no faith, because as a way of knowing, science works. That being said that doesn’t mean I am not a person who is without faith, as I think it’s very important, but I’m also willing to adjust what I have faith in if faced with evidence that counters what I believe to be true.

                  Liked by 1 person

                  • Well, I have evidence that in my opinion proves it true. No, I am not willing to speak on it, it’s a private experience. I can understand if you believe it’s a way to get out of this debate, but I’m not. I’m just not ready to speak on it.

                    As for what you said, I absolutely agree. I do. I just believe in God. I have absolute faith, and it won’t change. 🙂

                    Liked by 1 person

                    • Personal experience can be very powerful. I understand that, but I would never use it as a basis for truth in a larger sense even if it’s just true for me. Now obviously there are some things that are true for one person which cause no harm, but there are many things that are also not. As valuable as faith is, when we have faith in things that cause harm to others and faith becomes unmovable then this is not healthy. This where science is vastly different because it uncovering truth it demands that what is true for one person must be true for all people. The only thing that science and faith have in common is that both may be used to cause harm. I don’t doubt that your faith is harmless and makes you happier, and so there is no reason for you to change it. This however is a fairly rare occurrence especially for people who have such similar unshakable faith in a whole doctrine which is open to numerous interpretations and where people can pick and choose the parts that support what they already believe.

                      Liked by 3 people

                    • I don’t hurt anybody, or at least, I try my best not to. I know what hurt feels like. I’m not one to treat people that way.

                      As for others, I can’t control what they do, and I won’t try. I can only control me. I can only speak for myself. I’m working to fix myself and work to better myself, of which my faith helps.

                      I hope that’s understandable.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • SCS, I believe you are sincere, and that you have no desire to hurt others. This is just my observation, based on some things you’ve written, but you apparently believe in hell and Satan. What concerns me about this is that there are many people (especially children) who have experienced much torment over this belief. So, even though you do not intentionally mean to bring harm, you can when you talk about, or promote such beliefs.

                      Liked by 3 people

                    • See, I don’t believe in hell. I don’t believe in the eternal burning death. No where in the bible does it mention that. Ever. Seriously, it mentions a SECOND death, which is after the coming of Jesus, the rapture, and everything else. However no where, does it mention that when you die, you go to hell.

                      So, when I said spend an eternity knowing I was wrong, that didn’t mean hell. Also, what I teach my children is that, if you don’t believe, you won’t be able to be with the people you love forever.

                      I do not condone teaching a child their going to burn forever if they don’t listen. I’m sorry, call me a bad christian, but I believe our ‘hell’ is here.

                      I’m not a typical Christian. I know. I’ve been told before.

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                    • So, you don’t believe that those who don’t believe will be thrown in the lake of fire?

                      ” And anyone not found written in the Book of Life was cast into the lake of fire.” Revelations 20:15

                      Also, you come across as though you will be fully aware that you are dead for eternity. Is that not a form of torment? I recently saw a video of a woman telling her son that she no longer believed in god. He became exceedingly distressed and distraught that he wasn’t going to see his mommy in heaven.

                      Also, what kind of message might you be sending your children about others who don’t believe like you do — that they (the wicked, according to the bible) are deserving of punishment for not believing in your cultural god and living by your interpretation of the bible’s “moral” standards?

                      Death anxiety is common, but I think Christianity exacerbates it by teaching that if you don’t cut the muster, you’re going to be thrown in the lake of fire.

                      You mentioned that you are not like other Christians, but you really are. They all have their own interpretation of Christianity, which is why there are well over 40,000 sects of Christianity.

                      Liked by 3 people

                    • Well, then I guess I am. I’ll give you that much. However, we don’t know what will happen after we die. We truly don’t. We believe in Heaven, and some believe in hell (I still don’t). Like I said, I’d rather waste a lifetime believing in something that isn’t real, than spend an eternity realizing it was.

                      I don’t force my beliefs on anyone. I try not to anyway. I just try to do the best I can. The kids asked about Heaven, and I explained as I explained before. It’s never been brought up since. I just explain to love Jesus, because he died for us. That’s all they know. I don’t divulge into details. I was raised that was their choice, and I chose to believe. If my children learn about it, and choose not to, that’s on them. My love has no conditions attached. There will be no lecture, no hell based talk, just a simple okay, let’s agree to disagree and move forward.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • I understand. Most of us were all indoctrinated with the belief that Jesus died for us. We can only take the word of an ancient, error-ridden book written by anonymous writers who never knew Jesus. Nevertheless, I appreciate the fact that you are OK with your children finding their own path.

                      Liked by 3 people

                    • Well thank you. I appreciate that, and I can understand your opinion. Although I may disagree, I understand and respect it. 🙂

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • Spreadincrazysmiles:

                      […]So, when I said spend an eternity knowing I was wrong, that didn’t mean hell. Also, what I teach my children is that, if you don’t believe, you won’t be able to be with the people you love forever.[…]

                      So if not hell, then what? You follow-up with teaching your children (not burning forever) but separation forever from “the people you love.” What does that (separation) look like spreadincrazysmiles?

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                    • SCS,

                      “Like I said, I’d rather waste a lifetime believing in something that isn’t real, than spend an eternity realizing it was. ”
                      What you have written, is the invocation of Pascal’s Wager, devised by Blaise Pascal in the mid 17th century and has been refuted multiple times. It requires far too many assumptions to be practical and I think that if you really looked closely and take to heart what you’ve written – that you’d rather “waste” a lifetime on what is essentially and unproven and un-provable gamble, you’d almost certainly reconsider. A brief refutation of the wager:
                      1) The god you have chosen to believe in is one of a number of literally thousands that have come and gone in human history. The odds that you have chosen the correct god to worship is literally less than 1/10th of 1%. Possibly into the 1/100ths of 1%.
                      2) The person making the wager would have to assume that god would either not notice or not care whether the person professing belief was sincere or was feigning belief. This would make god out to be either stupid or one who prefers the company of sycophants and disingenuine people.
                      3) It assumes that belief is the sole path to salvation and righteousness and doesn’t take into account the possibility of changing one’s mind, before or even after death. It also doesn’t take into account actions and deeds.

                      It is for these reasons, that this wager must be rejected on its face.

                      Liked by 1 person

            • I believe we read the bible, say prayer and have a personal relationship with him.

              You have a personal relationship with a dead, imaginary friend? And you pray to him?
              Isn’t that a bit like Voodoo? Do you also have a Jesus doll, or a reasonable facsimile of a skinny white guy hanging from a cross?

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              • No, it’s not. It’s simply my beliefs. I choose to believe in him, as God. If you don’t, that’s okay too. 🙂 Have a nice day.

                Liked by 1 person

                • Have a nice day
                  Always. But how is praying to a dead skinny white guy any different than Voodoo or non sexual necrophilia?

                  Liked by 1 person

                  • Because that’s not how I see it. To YOU it might be that way, and that is fine.

                    To me, I’m not praying to the dead skinny white guy, I’m praying to the Deity, God to me, that I believe in.

                    To you, it’s the dead skinny white guy.

                    And to be honest, I’m chuckling as I write this. It sounds funny. I can see the humor in it, even if it contradicts my beliefs. I am human after all.

                    Then again, when you say Voodoo, I see dolls, and when I see dolls, I link it to Barbie, and then I see playing with barbies.

                    I’m a parent of young girls, don’t judge me.

                    Liked by 1 person

                    • LOL Amanda. That’s the spirit. Oh, and Ark is really a soft, cuddly puppy with a big bark. 😀

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • You might have to lay some newspapers. He’s not quite potty trained.

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                    • The thing I am trying to get at is this: What is the point of praying to a guy that’s been dead for 2000 years?
                      Is he going to do anything? No.
                      Has he ever done anything … no again.

                      Okay, he might be inspiration for a few better orgasms – I’ve known a couple of ladies who have called out to him on occasion – but other than this ….well, he’s just a wet blanket; a former smelly little eschatological Lake Tiberius pedestrian who was very likely gay ( or even bi-sexual) who pissed off the Romans and got himself nailed to a cross.

                      What on earth are you expecting when you put your hands together, screw your eyes up and say:
                      ”Oh, Lawd, hear my prayer.”

                      A free parking space at the Walmart or to hear that contraceptives have been banned and the US will soon be sin free? Or maybe that Obama is giving away free automatic weapons to anyone who can prove they are Christian?

                      So really, what is the point of praying a dead person?

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                    • “So really, what is the point of praying (to) a dead person?” Cause he doesn’t have the option of telling you to shut the fuck up cause your praying and whining are extremely annoying and irritating?

                      Liked by 1 person

      • Shields, you’re absolutely right; this rubbish is rammed down the throats of thousands of people every day after they lose their homes and loved ones, or any crisis, for that matter. I don’t use this word very often, but I consider it evil. Such rhetoric can lead to serious psychological problems including clinical depression and Religious Trauma Syndrome.

        Thanks for your comment. Great to see you.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. I used to be part of a brand of Christianity that definitely believed they could control the weather. You could review the storm in Jesus name, for example.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Grrrr. Wasn’t done. Anyway, I’ve seen multiple groups that trafficked in such nonsense. This all goes back to Jesus I’m afraid, the sending out of the disciples, the powers over disease and the devil. Their theology really isn’t wrong, but scripturally defensible.

      The problem is with their book of mythology and the nonsense it contains.

      Live from TEXAS, (and not proud of that)
      Matt

      Liked by 4 people

  10. Shocking weather. Hope you’ve all seen the back end of it.

    On a lighter night, as to you’re “Praise Jesus!” interviews, I’ve always loved this one from a few years ago:

    Liked by 3 people

  11. NN, I hear the same ridiculous religious assertions all the time in my hospice work and I’ve heard I don’t know how many times I’ve heard survivors and those grieving express their anger at the religious hubris aimed at them as if such assertions were meant to help the listener when it’s obvious the motivation to say such dribble is to make the speaker feel more powerful than they really are… and leave in their wake a lot of really angry people too nice to confront the assertions with how they made them feel.

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Perhaps the best response might be for anyone who suffered damage after the people had prayed to sue those people for sending the winds their way.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. People can be so insensitive. “God spared us”, and then who tore up the house of that other family?

    Liked by 2 people

  14. What can I say? Welcome back to the craziness Victoria

    Liked by 1 person

  15. It’s too bad they can’t interview all the people for whom prayer didn’t work to divert the tornado, because well they’re all dead. So not really the most balanced way of reporting. By the way the tornado did go to unpopulated places. Places that weren’t populated by them, so that’s all well and good!

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Yep, yep, yep, yep, yep.
    These are the things that make me irrationally angry. I know people are just glad to be safe, but to praise God when others are dead and destitute? Makes me want to say fuck your God and the theology behind him.

    Liked by 4 people

  17. Hope you are safe good friend.
    They call everyone else arrogant for questioning their beliefs but then in the next sentence say such things

    Liked by 1 person

  18. How could God allow this to happen? To let not only atheists suffer but also those who worship Him. Is there any divine justice?

    Liked by 3 people

  19. @spreadincrazysmiles and VictoriaNeuroNotes…

    SCS, first of all I must commend you for remaining civil with others on here — who are clearly non-Christian, atheists, or agnostic — and you are at least willing to engage on a few Xian subjects of theology, not necessarily “faith” as you allude to because some people have faith in Peter Pan, Santa Claus, and the Tooth Fairy. Exact meaning of terms is a necessity around here on VNN’s blog when discusssing (civily) matters of faith, belief, Xianity or any of the Abrahamic religions. And like Peter earlier, I too want to welcome you. I applaud your obvious courage here too. 🙂

    The first point (of moderate contention) I took with your initial comment and 1-3 following comments was…

    First off, as a Christian, God doesn’t command anyone to do a dang thing, and if they actually picked up their bible and read it, they would know God doesn’t have conversations or tell anyone anything. Period.

    Your first term or designation “Christian” is quite ambigious as you later differentiated yourself from “other Christians”…perhaps even others of “Faith.” Then the next sentence had all sorts of presuppositions inside it; perhaps quoting exact specific Bible/Scripture passages would’ve been more concise to your arguement? I’m assuming you could because you follow that with an impllicit statement that you’ve read a Bible (or passages inside a Bible), followed by a STRONG explicit statement that God or a Supreme Being (I’m assuming?) doesn’t talk to or “have conversations or tell anyone anything. Period. like a Deistic God/Being. Wow! No misinterpreting those words! 😉

    As simply a pure listener wanting to understand your exact meanings, just from that ONE sentence and final vehement last word, I have several questions, in order to avoid more confusions — that many people-of-faiths or Religions further mystify when speaking about their own “faith”… like Victoria NeuroNotes shows here — about whether knowing this knoweable God or unknoweable God is possible, as you are implying I think, and if it IS KNOWEABLE then do we take your personal experience as the proof or standard(?), do we take another group of believers knowing-standard(?), or some other means of knowing/unknowing? What form of measurement are you using on these seemingly genuine Wind-benders and Tornado-Commandos to proclaim them foolish? And Victoria, I guess that question(s) goes to you as well? 😉

    And before I get way too far ahead of myself with all my questions… WHICH “Bible” are we talking about spreadincrazysmiles??? There are at MINIMUM 45 different Bibles in print today — yes some similar, others quite different with different teachings — and there are perhaps 30,000+ various denominations simply within Protestant faiths all with their own interpretations about this “knoweable God”? I mean, Jeebus Motha of All Mary’s… WHO should we listen to or read!!!??? And now that my head has started spinning and hurting, my last intial question(s)…

    Is “faith” comprehensively in the world purely down to one single individual’s “experiences”… and there is no such thing as ONE standard of measurement!!!??? Those are civil genuine questions. Thank you. ❤

    Liked by 4 people

    • ” What form of measurement are you using on these seemingly genuine Wind-benders and Tornado-Commandos to proclaim them foolish? And Victoria, I guess that question(s) goes to you as well?”

      Professor, are you playing devil’s advocate with me? 😉

      OK, I’ll play.

      Science and lack of evidence.

      Also, the point of this post was about being completely insensitive to the sufferings of others in crisis, and sending the message that these particular Christians had more faith and seemingly were more important in their god’s eyes than the people killed in other communities and/or who lost their homes and businesses.

      The thing that is confusing with SCS’s stance is that she’s so sure that her god exists because the bible tells her so, and she had personal, “supernatural” experiences. Yet she claims that supernatural phenomena can’t be possible with the tornado-commando Christians, even though the bible claims that with just a tiny bit of faith (as in mustard seed size), a believer can tell a mountain to take a hike into the ocean.

      Liked by 4 people

  20. @Victoia & others: Have a look at https://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com/2015/12/29/npr-report-potential-tornado-victims-have-gods-power-to-divert-storms/ .

    A quote frpm that post: What would he had said if Lowe had averred that Zeus, or Satan, had given her power to divert the winds. And why would she have that power rather than others? Should Zeeble have asked her to answer that question, or why God decided to destroy the homes of others?

    As Reader Rik wrote, who also called my attention to this piece:

    While I’m glad she and her home were unharmed, it’s hard to imagine the arrogance it takes to believe a loving god spared you when others were killed or had their lives devastated by the same storm, supposedly caused by the same god.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I follow WEIT, and just saw that come over my reader about 30 minutes ago, so I had already read it. But the point about Zeus or Satan is excellent. IMO, it was a poor interview and left me scratching my head. The fact that this was on NPR is disconcerting. Like Jerry stated, were they trying to show how backwards Texas is? Or was there another motive?

      Thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 1 person

    • bbnewsab…

      Great point and share. Thank you! I’m about to get slightly abstract here. As I’ve come to study and TRY to understand Quantum Physics — operative word there is “try” — I see more and more how utterly complex Nature, the Solar System, the Milky Way, the Multiverse, and then go the other direction to the molecular, the atomic, the sub-atomic, and so on… properly should remove about all possible human arrogance for the next 2-3 millenia! One cause and effect over there causes another different (negative or positive) effect here. Take that to the Quantum level and you have “Spooky-Action-at-a-Distance” not just next to you but everywhere, probably way beyond one’s imagination; i.e. Quantum Entanglement! 😮

      But for some very sad violent history of human-control under Dominion Theologies and/or Totalitariaism, thinking and teaching outside-the-box was forbidden and in other ways today STILL forbidden via methods of fear and damnation. 😦

      Humankind is way overdue for the embracing and teaching of Pluralism, Paradox, and collaborative Science — which accurately reflects our existence anyway — and completely trash ancient antiquate paradigms that honestly have HORRIBLE human track records, IMHO! LOL

      Like

  21. I’m reading here of skinny white guys hanging on crosses and being worshiped as gods. I’ve NEVER heard anything more ridiculous. REAL gods are skinny olive skin guys hanging on crosses. Any fool could tell you that. I really wish more people would understand, and accept, the inarguable reality of this. It would make the world a better, more harmonious place for all.

    Like

  22. Those tornadoes are something else Victoria! I am just glad that you are okay. Great post and well said. It also irritate the crap out of me when people do that. No ‘god’ would allow anything like that and spare only some folks just because they ‘prayed’. Some people are just so ignorant and really stupid!

    Wishing you a wonderful and happy New 2016. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Pingback: When You’re So Full Of Yourself, You Tell Tornadoes Where To Go | Scotties Toy Box

  24. While I agree with the other commenters about how creepy the idea of thanking god for wiping out the folks down the road and not me is, I have to wonder if the practice/habit may be seated in a deep part of the brain and is a defense mechanism to deal with survivor guilt? If my survival was due to something considered to be far beyond me personally and the disaster that befell others also due to that same mechanism, then I don’t have to feel bad about surviving when others perished. Just a thought. I also wonder why people persist in living in such areas, but I bet they think the same about me in Earthquake Country (not Oklahoma, California).
    Happy New Year to all!

    Liked by 1 person

    • A type of survivors guilt? It could be, but I have reservations. It’s one thing to think to yourself that your god spared you from death and/or disaster, but to say it around those who lost loved ones and/or property is, IMO, incredibly insensitive.

      Also, there’s not too many places on the planet where you are completely safe from natural disasters.

      Nice to see you again, Mariah. Best wishes to you for 2016.

      Like

      • When you have scientists finding solutions in quantum mechanics such as tildeb posted here with the radio show on Dec 30 that is beyond amazing, the breakthroughs in all realms of science over a hundred years and the unknown secrets to still be discovered within our world and this universe and indeed our brains, it is truly an indescribable feeling of disappointment when someone claims the answer to everything is a god.

        I have a hard time getting my head around why some people cling so desperately onto deceptive ancient religious doctrine that inherently alters the cognitive usefulness of the brain so much so that it renders logic, evidence, rationality and free thinking into an offensive position to defend their fanciful indoctrinated world view fuelled purely on imagination that they call faith.

        Liked by 1 person

        • It is amazing, isn’t it – to keep to a faith commitment when reality is so much more fascinating and the pursuit of trying to understand it so rewarding. I love the great unknown.

          Liked by 1 person

          • I agree tildeb the great unknown is something that enriches lives.

            I do not have your expertise on brains Victoria but I think that even if no god gene exists I think if the unknown is exciting enough in the materialist reality of life for some of us it overrules ridiculous teachings of the unbelievable such as a higher power in the spiritual world.

            When I was about a 10-year-old kid and I heard about God at Sunday school I always thought that this is just another fantasy similar to Santa dreamed up by people because nobody knows the truth. I was always amazed so many people especially oldies were so gullible.

            I found this godly stuff had no interest at all because it is based on fantasy claims, monotonous biblical passages, praying to someone in the sky and most of all it was just completely bloody ridiculous.

            I still feel the same way; however more convinced in my convictions but benevolence overcomes me and the need for some blogging to save these poor buggers from themselves.

            Like

        • I listened to the show shortly after Tildeb posted it, and it was quite fascinating. As far as your comment about having a hard time wrapping your head around why some people cling so desperately onto deceptive ancient religious doctrine that inherently alters the cognitive usefulness of the brain — with every brain and behavior study I read, I’m getting a better understanding. This understanding does come with discouragement, because many people need a sense of certainty even if it comes at a great cost to themselves and others.

          Liked by 1 person

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