Victoria NeuroNotes

About

VNN blogHi.  I’m Victoria. Thanks for visiting.  Several of my posts are related to religious belief and what I’ve learned through the lens of neurology, psychology, biology, sociology, geophysiology, and anthropology, etc.  For most of my life I was a devout Christian.  My painstaking deconversion journey commenced 2000 and ended in 2005.

I identify with the precepts of humanism. As a free-thinker, there is no area of thought that I am afraid to explore, to challenge, to question, or to doubt. I have no issues with people who believe in god(s).  But I do take issue with beliefs and ideologies that interfere with the rights and well-being of others.

I’ve met many bloggers who have inspired me with their authenticity and courage; as well as their ideas, knowledge, and talents.  I have found a fantastic community here on WordPress — and have met some life-long friends.

The best moments usually occur when a person’s body or mind is stretched to its
  limits in a voluntary effort to accomplish something difficult and worthwhile.” 
  ~Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

A few things about me:

  • I have a great interest in behavioral neuroscience.  The more knowledge we gain about the brain and the impact that environment (including culture, especially religion)  has on it, the better our chances of surviving and thriving (peacefully) as citizens of this planet.  We have the resources, tools and knowledge to make that a reality.  I am encouraged.
  • Reading vast amounts of research challenged my indoctrinated assumptions about ‘human nature’, and positively changed my outlook on life.
  • Understanding the impact that geomagnetic activity, space weather, and infrasound can have on humans, also occupies my time.  The numerous studies are fascinating and serve to explain a lot of the so called supernatural phenomena.
  • Reading is my favorite pass time.   I prefer non-fiction.  Autumn is my favorite season.   I suppose the main reason is because I’ve lived in warmer, humid climates for the better part of life, and the crisp, cool air is a welcomed relief.
  • I have one child, a daughter, who is now a young woman and has left the nest.  We have a close relationship and a special friendship.  I can’t imagine my life without her.
  • Being creative energizes me and I love how I feel when I’m in that state of flow.  When I’m in that flow I can lose awareness of time.  I have an eye for design and can make any space, inside or out, feel and look like a peaceful resort.
  • I live in the Bible Belt on the Gulf Coast.  I love being in and around water.  The first time I went scuba diving, I wept.  I was in awe.
  • I enjoy sightseeing, conversations with substance and spending time with close friends.   But, there’s no place like home — which is to say — I’m a homebody.

Thanks again for dropping by.  Please don’t hesitate to leave comments, either here or on my other blog.  I’m interested in your thoughts/feedback and enjoy discourse.

To Michelle: Thank you for the song dedication❣ —> “Just follow your arrow where ever it points.” My motto exactly.

128 thoughts on “About

  1. Oh my… on your “Few Things About Me” list…

    BIG-TIME yes.
    Yes, a little…perhaps more.
    Definitely yes! The metaphysical dimensions of existent are becoming less unknown and fortunately more accessible.
    Yes, parent of two: daughter (19), son (12). With their mother.
    Yes. Romance is one of many intimate forms of intense (vital?) interaction, sharpening, and growing between Soul MateS.
    Yes, can SO relate to this — I am an orchid, not a dandelion. Hah!
    Not entrepreneural but more entre-post-neural in a most Frenchy way; my Bohemian tendacies. 😉
    And most certainly yes…in my most harmonic melodious song, as uniquely common a Free-thinking Humanist can sing!

    Yes, I will be visiting often Lady Victoria. *humbly tips his hat to you*

    Liked by 1 person

    • Professor, you said:

      “Not entrepreneural but more entre-post-neural in a most Frenchy way; my Bohemian tendacies.”

      I am ‘full blooded half French’ 😉 so I relate to the Frenchy part, and I definitely have Bohemian tendencies. Conventional, I am not, as you will soon discover if you haven’t already. 😀

      Btw, kind Sir, orchards are my favorite flower.

      Edited: Sorry for the typo when addressing you. Have corrected.

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      • Delightfully discovering!

        Oh oh, two Frenchies together? Ooooo, the spectacle we could cause, huh? “A spectacular Spectacular! No words in the vernacular can describe this great event! You’ll be dumb with wonderment…” to quote one of my all-time favorite movies. 😉

        So…am I to infer that I am now a “favorite flower” in your garden? LOL

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  2. “So…am I to infer that I am now a “favorite flower” in your garden?”

    Indeed, and I promise not to pluck you up and plop you in a jar of chlorinated tap water. That’s just so ‘conventional’ and dare I say, pure stupidity. lol

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  5. What wonderful site and fantastic description of your mission. Your first paragraph has me hooked for good!

    “It’s about Synaptic Pruning (liberty), which is to say that I have spent the last decade trying to atrophy — prune disadvantageous neural pathways/connections that were created by a lifetime of religious indoctrination and social conditioning. Blogging is another tool I’m using to help me accomplish this.”

    Pretty sure we are kindred spirits. So glad I stumbled upon you yesterday. Can’t wait to read and learn more!
    Michelle

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  6. OMGoodness, Michelle. I loved your comment. You ‘get it’. I’m pretty sure we are kindred spirits, too. 😀 I’m looking forward to reading your blog when things settled down for me a bit. I tend to spend more of my spare time reading blogs than writing them. That’s because I love getting to know others, and I most definitely look forward to getting to know you. ღ

    Victoria

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  7. Just came across your blog, as I just posted my first two entries and am feeling pretty vulnerable, half hoping no one ever reads it 😉 Thanks for sharing your life with us. I imagine this feeling is something I will get over eventually?

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    • Hi Shellync,

      First, please accept my apology for not responding sooner. I don’t know how I missed your post. I think it must have been due to the craziness (good craziness) that transpired after one of my posts was Freshly Pressed. As far as feeling trepidations about sharing your life with others, I totally get that. I only recently did an About page with personal ‘stuff’. On my other blog, it took me forever to do an about page there as well, and I’ve been blogging for almost 2 years now. It strange that I feel that way, because I love reading other peoples About page and getting to know the writer a little better. Total paradox on my part.

      Welcome to the world of blogging. I think you are going to love the supportive community here. I look forward to reading your blog.

      All my best to you,

      Victoria

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  8. Victoria, am here now. Hadn’t seen this other blog and congratulations.
    We share one interest, that humans can find a way to live in peace with each other and I will depend on you for the neurology of it.

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  9. Psst! I’ve been thinking about you. You mentioned you had a lot going on, I hope it’s all going well. 🙂

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  10. *jumps up and down waving at the Muggle*

    Hey Madalyn, so great to see you pop in. 🙂 I’m still thinking about your comment in the Toad’s post.
    Effing brilliant.

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  11. Love what you shared here – and especially the part about crying after your first dive. I did not cry after my first dive – because I was just so relieved that I finally fell backwards off of the six-pack boat we were on (actually had to be gently nudged to get in) – but even though I did not cry – I know it rocked my world forever – and anytime I would try to describe that first time under water – seeing those colors I saw – and the fish swimming near me – and learning how not to make those sand storms with my fins – well it stirs up joy – – and even the lake dives – with the brown murky water had some perks – anyhow, also liked that Csikszentmihalyi quote (and I love his work on flow) – and interior design too?#! Wow – what a gift mix you have – and I think that is why I enjoy your writing – it takes on different hues at different times –
    I am truly grateful I stumbled on your blog(s).

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  12. Hi Victoria!
    I have nominated you for 3 Awards, because I think you have a great imagination and your blog is truly creative and special. I hope you will accept! Congratulations and here is the link:
    http://simplyilka.com/2014/03/01/imagine-there-is-lots-of-sunshine-to-shine-on-more-awards/

    -Ilka

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  14. For some reason, I felt this would be appropriate here, both because of the neurological implications within the poem, and the fact that it was written nearly two hundred years ago, by diminutive Emily Dickinson, who spent her entire life on a tiny Massachusetts acreage, yet saw universes in her mind:

    The brain within its groove
    Runs evenly and true;
    But let a splinter swerve,
    ‘T were easier for you
    To put the water back
    When floods have slit the hills,
    And scooped a turnpike for themselves,
    And blotted out the mills!
    ~ Emily Dickinson ~

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  15. Wow, I’ve always thought neuroscience was fascinating! I love the mind and human behavior. I’ve also never read a romance novel although I’m a very romantic person. 🙂 So glad to have found you through Christie’s site!

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  16. I must say, I am totally hooked now and at this stage I am stuck on your Neuro Research Project and want to go and read all the articles there. The mind is a fascinating subject indeed or should I say the brain?

    Pleased to meet you Victoria and I am glad I’ve seen you on Ark’s blog. You sound like a lovely and fascinating person and it’s always great to meet someone who had the same experiences. You will however notice that sometimes I don’t say much. Sometimes I don’t know what to say and other times I have too much to say. I am more a visual kind of person and there are days when I can’t sit in front of the pc for too long but today isn’t one of those days so I am going to take this opportunity to enjoy your NRP articles. Thanks for sharing. You have a great blog! 😀

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    • Sonel — Wow! I was flabbergasted when I woke up this morning and checked my email notifications. I can’t thank you enough for taking the time to read through my other blog so extensively and also take time to comment. I don’t take such things lightly. Thank you so much — it was so encouraging. I haven’t been very active on my NRP blog lately, mostly because I’ve been active here and needing to get some ‘stuff’ off my chest *wink*, but I’ve got several unfinished post in draft on the NRP blog that I hope to complete soon. They are research intense, and it takes me a while to go through the often lengthy studies and then post the most relevant information in a cohesive manner.

      You remind me of myself. It’s not unlike me to take a full day out to read someone’s blog in pretty much one sitting. Like you, I don’t do it all the time, but I do when I can. I didn’t realize others did that too. 😀

      Again, thank you! It’s a pleasure to meet you.

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      • hehe! Well, I am glad I could provide some happiness and you are very welcome. You are a great writer and researcher and I could see that you take it very serious indeed. That is what one do when you are interested in something and it is nice when others see it as well. I could also see all the time it took and that is not something that should be taken lightly.

        It’s no problem for me. I am following both of them, so I will get notifications if you do publish. I love reading your posts and it’s good to get ‘stuff of your chest’. You do it so well too. 😀

        Sounds like lots of hard work indeed and I can only imagine all the time it takes and I know I appreciate and love reading about it all. One of my favourite writers is Robin Cook and I’ve always been fascinated by medical stuff and things that can’t be explained or things that people think they can explain. Will we ever know for sure. Except when you read it on Facebook. Then it must be true. 😛 😆

        That’s good to know. I always try to take one day in a week and then just choose one of my followers’ blog and then I will go through their blog and see what I missed. Some really work hard on their blogs and what they do, just like you do and well, it doesn’t cost me anything to put in a little more effort. I know it’s appreciated. 😀

        It’s a pleasure as well hon. People like you just make me love WordPress more. Thanks again for a lovely and interesting blog and for all your hard work. It’s really appeciated. 😀 ♥ Hugs ♥

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    • PS — I tried to comment on your About page, but noticed that your comments are closed. Had to tell you that I had a dear cat whose name was Simba. I adored him. He’s deceased now. Also, I just had to comment on what you said in your About page regarding Facebook and WordPress:

      “That is why I love WordPress. It’s way better than Facebook, less complicated and much more personal, interesting and lots more fun.”

      I couldn’t agree more. I only recently joined FaceBook (in the last month) because my daughter begged me. So like you, I only have a very, very select few (can count on one hand) I’ve added as friends. It’s crazy over there. 😉

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      • Thanks Victoria and sorry for that. I normally have it set on closing comments after 7 days and keep forgetting that it includes the pages as well. I fixed it for now. Why I do that is because sometimes I can’t be in front of the pc and then I don’t want the comments to lie there unanswered and bloggers think that I am ignoring them. 🙂

        Awww, how sweet and I am sorry about your loss hon and believe me, I know how it feels. They are such a blessing in our lives. 😀

        Oh believe me when I say I do love WordPress way more than Facebook. I had a page just for FB games which I deactivated and one page for family and friends only, but the family we have are the type that will come and visit friends here where we live just around the corner and they won’t bother to let us know or even pop in for a cuppa and say hello. That was one of the issues that always bothered me. But the minute they want or need something, it’s the quickest response you’ll get on FB. That irritates me and well, I am then not very tactful or polite. So I deleted them all as well. I only have hubby and my boys on there, I don’t ‘like’ any pages or join any groups and that’s the way it’s going to say. The few friends we do have here also knows me well enough not to ask because they know they won’t like my answer and I feel I don’t owe any of them any explanation as well.

        You’re right about the craziness. I am crazy enough as it is and don’t need anything else to help with it. 😆

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        • hahah — you’re not crazy — just weird, like me. Not ‘weird, weird’ as my old roommate once said to me — just weird. She meant it as a compliment. 😀

          I’ve got several irons in the fire right now, but I promise to respond to your thoughtful comments on my other blog, and I am really looking forward to reading your blog as time permits.

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          • Oh, I love weird and I take that as a huge compliment. That makes us not ‘plain’ or ‘boring’. I don’t do boring. I do weird. LOL!

            Please do not worry about commenting, really. If you really want to, take your time. I promise you, I won’t take offense at all hon. I know how it is. You will see I hardly ever comment sometimes and today was just one of those days where everything just ‘bubbled over’ and it’s mostly because I also the brain and all the ‘workings’ so fascinating and you’ve done your research so well. I totally loved reading about everything. 😀

            You will notice I don’t visit blogs just so I can get comments or visits. I visit blogs I find interesting, so never worry about things like that. I know how life can get in the way sometimes and you have your priorities that must come first, so do what you need to do. Know that I will understand. I will in themeantime still enjoy visiting your lovely posts. Thanks. 😀 ♥ Hugs ♥

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            • Oh my goodness. You have really brightened my day. Massive amounts of endorphins flowing, and did I ever need that, I tell ya. Lol

              I will write more later. I’m in the middle of a heated debate. Hehe Some fundie who believes that his god is compassionate — you know — like genocide is an act of “love”. Now THAT’s crazy!

              *Huge hug to my new ‘weird’ friend* 😀

              And again, thank you so much for your kind, encouraging words, and support. Meant the world to me. I’m looking forward to getting to know you better.

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              • Well, I am very glad to hear that hon. Let’s keep those endorphins flowing then. What else can I tell you? 😆 Lemme think. I must still have some stored somewhere. hahahaha

                You do that and enjoy. Gosh! Thanks for correcting me on being crazy to weird because that is crazy for sure! Good gods! How anyone can believe that is beyond me. Are folks like that brainwashed or is it something in their drinking water? Goodness! Please lead him on the straight path. I know you can! 😀

                You are very welcome and it’s always a pleasure hon and I am very glad. Your appreciation means the world to me as well and the same here. 😀 ♥ Hugs ♥

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  17. Sonel, let me jump in here just long enough to say that I am REALLY sorry that RoughSeas said the things to you, on Ark’s site, that she did – they were entirely unjustified.

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    • That is so sweet of you to say Arch and no need to apologize. As for what happened, I already forgot about it. As for RoughSeas, don’t be too hard on her. Maybe she had a bad day. Who knows? I am not angry at her and don’t hold a grudge, even if she thinks I’m an idiot, which is fine by me as well. I have the attitude of ‘it takes one to know one.’ 😆 I grew up in two households who called me worse names than that and I am still alive. hahahaha!

      Here on WP it’s easy to misunderstand intentions and it’s like Victoria also said, ‘we all have our own filters, and sometimes text without body language can be misinterpreted.’ and I totally agree with that. I am also not blameless at all. I could have kept quiet. So, forget about it and thanks for caring. You are too kind. 😀 ♥ Hugs ♥ for you just because you’re so sweet. 😀

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  18. Awww, you’re only saying that because it’s true —

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  19. ” Goodness! Please lead him on the straight path. I know you can!”

    Awww, thanks for the confidence. Sadly, neither myself, nor Arch, nor many others who are very well read have been able to set such people on the “straight path”. After weeks of giving them the benefit of the doubt, it appears that they are too far gone. Effing religion. 😦

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  21. I don’t even attempt to understand my brain damage anymore – the greatest relief was knowing it explained a lot of things.

    http://notestoponder.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/brain-damage/

    🙂

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    • “the greatest relief was knowing it explained a lot of things.”

      Notes, although I commented on your link a while back, and I really appreciate you sharing it here, I just wanted to follow up on your comment and say that I couldn’t agree more. After spending years trying to understand about my late husbands TBI, everything fell into place with regard to, as you say, research explaining a lot. I did find relief. I wished we had known then what we know now about TBI. He was really hard on himself. Thanks again for the link to your post and for taking the time to comment here. I’m behind on my reader, but I always enjoy reading your interesting and informative posts. I look forward to catching up.

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  22. I admit, I only like this page because you have a picture of Sponge Bob and Patrick on the Fiery Fist of Pain roller coaster! 🙂

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  23. Here’s a website that’s very informative and the folks running it are fighting the good fight. Check it out: http://www.politicalresearch.org/#

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    • Jeff, a huge thanks for sharing this site. Right up my alley. 🙂

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    • Holy crap, Jeff. I was reading the article the New Apostolic Reformation from the website you linked, and I see they, the NAR, are using the very mind-control strategies I mentioned in my post “How I Fell In Love With Jesus”. Here’s what the article says:

      “It’s also culturally savvy, sponsoring youth events that look more like rock concerts than traditional church services. Its stylish leaders dress in casual clothes, encourage fasting and repetitive chanting as a means of inducing altered mental states, and use sophisticated media strategies and techniques to deliver their message.”
      http://www.politicalresearch.org/2013/03/22/spiritual-warriors-with-an-antigay-mission/

      ————–

      What’s very disconcerting is that they believe in spiritual warfare, and want to cast out demons from people who are not Christians. Very scary stuff — very, very scary minds. The leader, David Lane, says he is counting on a revival—another Great Awakening—to sweep Christians of the right sort into positions of power. Well, looks like his mind-controlling strategies are working. 😦

      This very hyper-religious, hence, severely mentally ill man said this: “He told conservative Iowa radio talk show host Steve Deace the following month that “car bombs in Los Angeles, Washington, D.C. and Des Moines, Iowa” would be merciful punishment from God for legalized abortion and for “homosexuals praying at the Inauguration [of President Obama’s second term].” Without such divine mercy, Lane suggested, America might “get judgment like Nazi Germany.”

      The article further states: “You ask,” Lane wrote in his WND essay, elaborating on Leithart’s theme, “‘What is our goal?’ To wage war to restore America to our Judeo-Christian heritage with all of our might and strength that God will give us. You ask, ‘What is our aim?’ One word only: victory, in spite of all intimidation and terror.”

      Lane’s essay is a clarion call for a contemporary religious war against the supposedly pagan government of the United States. And his notion of war is not just a metaphor for politics. He even called for a contemporary “Gideon” and a “Rahab the Harlot” to rise to the occasion. Gideon is the Biblical figure who leads an Israelite army in an ethnic cleansing of the Midianites who were both oppressors and worshiped false gods.”

      Can you fucking believe that? Lane apparently thinks ethnic cleansing of us “pagans” is OK so long as it’s for the glory of the Christian god. But he’s not the only Christian nutter. He has a huge support system. Take note of the section: Witness Against America, where it states that the accelerating advance of LGBTQ rights, especially marriage equality, has become a flashpoint for the Christian Right’s revolutionary impulses. It’s states that Peter Leithart took to the influential blog of the journal First Things (founded by the late neoconservative Catholic thinker Richard John Neuhaus) to declare that the decision “presents American Christians with a call to martyrdom.” It states that “ignoring Lane, Leithart, McCloskey, Whitney, and their like—or assuming that they are anything less than deadly serious—could be an error of historic significance.”

      http://www.politicalresearch.org/2014/06/11/rumblings-of-theocratic-violence/

      I am deeply worried. Why won’t these radical Christians leave us alone and let us live our own lives in peace. 😦

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  24. Indeed. Often when I tell people about the dangers of religion and allowing it and its followers to be given great deference and be treated like babies in swaddling clothes, I get stern, confused looks, as if I were mad. These people, and their hatred, are very, very dangerous.

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  25. I am so glad I found your site. I love your attitude and your passion for intellectual honesty. I certainly understand, as you probably know by now, just how difficult is the journey from faith to reason. It requires no small degree of strength.

    I’m looking forward to reading more of your posts. You are an inspiration.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Hope your holidays were good, friend! I miss you!

    Liked by 2 people

  27. She should be back online in the next week or so, MMJ.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Just when you thought it was safe to back into the water —

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  29. She just may have lost her touch —

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  30. The empty comment, just above mine – at least it WAS empty when I commented, you must have “fixed” it. It helps when you’re the Admin —

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  31. The comment space had your name and the date, and below that, the word, “Like” – other than that, it was empty/ When I returned, suddenly there was a shark. I received two emails from your website, each with a different header, indicating that it was not an accidental duplicate, but rather two separate efforts on your part to post the shark, which tells me you were having problems. Something smells fishy here, and I suspect it involves more than our fine finned friend.
    (I like a lot of alliteration –!)

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  32. The only thing smelling fishy is you.” – You’re pikeing on me, I really think you should just squid while you’re ahead.

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  33. Hello Victoria! I’ve decided to read and follow 15 interesting and new blogs a day every day for the first month of 2015, and yours is today’s #1! Feel free to come visit me when you can at http://www.thatssojacob.wordpress.com, and follow if you like what you read. Happy new year and happy blogging!

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Neuroscience is such a exciting field of research. It’s a pleasure to meet you and I look forward to becoming blogging friends. Your blog looks interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Think Always. I have enjoyed reading your comments on Nan’s blog this past weekend. It’s a pleasure to meet you as well, and I look forward to running into you more often.

      “Neuroscience is such a exciting field of research.

      I couldn’t agree more. It provided answers to questions I had all my life but were never answered as a believer. It became quite apparent to me that the gods knew nothing about the brain. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  35. The gods have never known more than the men who created them.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Just thought I’d pass this long in case you hadn’;t seen it yet or considered the possibilities. Fascinating.

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  37. D’oh! You don’t have a follow new posts by email widget thing in your comments.

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  38. Oh, well that other blog was created before this blog and it’s “Neuro Research Project” with a subtitle N℮ür☼N☮☂℮ṧ. Sorry about the confusion but they are two distinct blogs, though I use one moniker.

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  39. This sound similar to doing ‘good’ apologetics – read this bit this way, turn 90*, read that bit that way, push these buttons, link this bit to that, erase, go back, clear the 404 error message, push that button, turn to this section… you get the idea.

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  40. Hi Victoria: I’ve been reading you blog on and off for about a year now. I wonder if it is easier or harder to leave liberal religion. Maybe someday I will be a godless non Church goer but I’m not there yet.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Gakeat, it’s nice to see you here, and thank you for reading my blog. Didn’t our paths cross on JJ’s blog? I think you bring up a good question. Personally, I doubt I would have left religion had I been solely involved in liberal Christianity. Had I been a liberal Christian I doubt I would have studied the Bible as extensively as I did. As hard as it was for me to go through my deconversion, I’m glad I had the experience because I learned a lot, and gained a peace I doubt I would have experienced otherwise

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      • Thanks for your thoughts. Yes, we did cross paths at JJ’s blog. I will use this comment in my discernment process.

        Liked by 1 person

      • As an update on this, I am extremely close to go with what logic tells me, and that there is no evidence for any gods. But I guess I need a little prodding to make this step.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Gakeat, I feel for you. At least you have been fortunate enough to be around more liberal Christians (if I recall correctly), and hopefully the transition hasn’t been as painful as it was for many of us — which included losing jobs and being shunned.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Any issues I have had are internal, not external. So much of how I have seen myself down through the years is related to me being a Churchgoer. When I finally quit in the next few weeks, it will feel different for me. But I can no longer affirm a god In any way, so I know I must become completely nonreligious. I am sure once I am out for a few months, I will be fine.

            Liked by 1 person

  41. Gakeat – what you do, is up to you, but if I may, I’d like to offer you another man’s Journey

    Liked by 1 person

  42. “The studies are fascinating and serve to explain a lot of the so called supernatural phenomena.”

    May I ask, Victoria, whether you can provide any link to your own writing on the matter?

    Liked by 1 person

  43. Hi Victoria,

    Since you mentioned that we do not know one another all that well, I thought I’d drop by and leave you access to a post I did a year or so ago. I don’t mean it to boast, but I’ve been involved in justice/peace issues for quite a while:

    http://desertabba.me/2015/01/19/through-the-rear-view-window/

    Having spent four decades as a Protestant pastor (seminary in the early 60s), most of which was an intellectual and spiritual struggle since most parishioners understood their goal as ‘heaven’ and I was aiming to fashion them into followers-of-Jesus-change-agents, my relationship with church for the past 16 years has been my pension check (back pay, I figure). I find in secular Buddhism my best materialist understandings of human consciousness. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders exemplify what I perceive to be the best in contemporary political options.

    I find common ground in your understanding of both the human mind and the politics you pursue.

    Good to make your acquaintance.

    Ron

    Liked by 1 person

  44. Hi Victoria! I love your work. Would love to correspond with you via email! Any way that could happen?

    Liked by 1 person

  45. Hi Victoria. Hope you’re well. I remember you mentioning you were having surgery done so I hope all is well. $Amen$

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Jeff. I’m on the road to recovery. Had my surgery on May 20th. Multiple doctors were so sure I had cancer, even though the initial pathology report said I didn’t, that they removed 1/2 my colon, and at the same time, I had a full hysterectomy. The dual operation resulted in a 13 inch horizontal incision in my abdomen. The severe pain I was having, initially, was due to several large benign fibroids which occur in about 40% percent of women, and don’t require a full hysterectomy to remove them.

      So, after the second pathology reports, no cancer was found in my uterus, cervix, ovaries or colon….zip, notta. The invasive surgery was totally unnecessary. Published in the Journal of American Medical Association, medical errors are the 3rd leading cause of death in America. Ahh, health care in America. Gotta love it.

      Liked by 1 person

  46. So sorry you had to endure all that. Simply awful to hear. Glad you’re on the recovery road, though. I’ll be thinking of you.

    Liked by 2 people

  47. Sorry for what you went through; glad it wasn’t cancer. Actually, I was hoping it was for a personality transplant —

    Like

  48. Possibly you can find a translator —

    Like

  49. Are you sure you didn’t get a lobotomy?

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  50. Trust me, it’s better to have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy!

    Besides, you know you’re crazy about me, you’re just playing hard to get —

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  51. While it’s true I’m smokin’, I don’t smoke —

    Liked by 1 person

  52. Victoria! It’s me, Michael Vito Tosto. I seem to have misplaced your email. Anyway, if you’re still sympathetic to the atheist cause, and if you still think my writing has potential, can you please repost this on your blog and/or Facebook: https://www.gofundme.com/244v4re4

    Like

  53. Hi Victoria. Not only are you my namesake, (first name Victor but I go by my middle name, Al) but another person with whom I can identify in my journey away from God belief. For the record, my mother wanted me to be a girl whom see would call Victoria, but back then,there was no way to tell. Naturally I disappoint her and thus, Victor A. Anyway, I noticed you liked a comment I made on KIA’s blog so I came over to visit. It has been a long arduous road for me to finally be true to myself. I was raised in Christianity and bought in from a outward standpoint. However, inside, I never really accepted the premises espoused and truly was just going through the motions. I was 58 in 2001 when the Twin Towers went down. It triggered something inside me that shouted, enough of the charade. I spoke with my minister (who also happened to be a good friend) and “came out.” It has since been a revelation (possibly poor word choice here) of freedom and harmony that I can hardly describe. It has been nice to discover KIA and yourself to give my choice a bit of validation, although I certainly don’t need it to understand I made the right decision.

    Also, it is interesting that you are an expert in neurology. My wife is the Regional Director of the Epilepsy Foundation of Virginia here in Virginia Beach. I assist her in many areas. We see first hand the ravages of neurological disorders. In addition, our son has Tourettes so we have been dealing with that for many years. I will be following your blog and look forward to your insightful posts that should be educational in many areas of my life.

    Apologies for the length of this comment.

    Al Hood

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Al, it’s very nice to meet you, and I really appreciate that you shared so personally. You wrote that it has been a long arduous road for you to finally be true to yourself. Those are powerful words — words I can really relate to. I can also relate to the freedom and harmony you mentioned, as well. It’s kind of ironic that I never really experienced that “peace” the bible talks about until after I deconverted, Lol.

      I’m not an expert in neurology, but I am fairly well read in certain ares, and quite involved in advocacy. It is so awesome to learn that your wife is the Regional Director of the Epilepsy Foundation and that you assist as well. I’m sorry to hear about your son. My late husband developed epilepsy after sustaining a traumatic braid injury. I wrote about our unfortunate circumstances 3 years ago on my other blog,. If you’re interested you can read about it here. At the time (in the 80’s), most doctors knew very little about TLE — (partials seizures) — especially where I lived — a small town in Alabama.

      Btw, no need to apologize about the length of comments on my blog, and thanks so much for the follow. I intend to follow yours, and look forward to reading your posts and getting to know you better. 🙂

      Victoria

      Like

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